MLE

Lonesome not Lonely.
thisisjusttosayihave:

Grape: Zante Currant (AKA Black Corinth, Black Currant, Lunchbox Grape, Champagne Grapes, etc)
Color: BlackCountry: Greece
National Grape Registry notes: 'Black Corinth' raisins are used mostly for cooking and baking because of their small size and tender skin. The fresh grapes are occasionally used by wineries for blending and color. They are also shipped fresh as ‘Black Corinth’ grapes for use as a culinary and beverage garnish.

Own notes: Totes adorbs.

thisisjusttosayihave:

Grape: Zante Currant (AKA Black Corinth, Black Currant, Lunchbox Grape, Champagne Grapes, etc)

Color: Black
Country: Greece


National Grape Registry notes: 'Black Corinth' raisins are used mostly for cooking and baking because of their small size and tender skin. The fresh grapes are occasionally used by wineries for blending and color. They are also shipped fresh as ‘Black Corinth’ grapes for use as a culinary and beverage garnish.

Own notes: Totes adorbs.

tattooedtealady:

It’s time to introduce a brand new feature to Tattooed Tealady for 2014: The mid-week pamper. Today I’ve shared a luxurious and extravagant bath oil which promises to make bath time an extra special treat. It smells delicious, too!
Read my post - The mid-week pamper #1

Ooooooohhh!!!!!!!

tattooedtealady:

It’s time to introduce a brand new feature to Tattooed Tealady for 2014: The mid-week pamper. Today I’ve shared a luxurious and extravagant bath oil which promises to make bath time an extra special treat. It smells delicious, too!

Read my post - The mid-week pamper #1

Ooooooohhh!!!!!!!

witchywonderworks:

Featured Oil: Rose Otto (Rosa damascena)Historical/Traditional Uses:The use of rose for medicinal purposes, most likely in the form of unguents made by macerating rose petals in hot fats or oils, is mentioned in Ayurvedic writings (~1500 BC to 500 CE) and in Dioscorides’ De Materia Medica (1st century BC). It is thought that roses were first distilled in the 8th century in Morocco to obtain rosewater, but there is evidence of primitive stills dating as far back as 10,000 BC. The physician and alchemist Avicenna is credited for being the first to distill roses for the essential oil in the 11th century. Extraction Process: Steam distillationBlossoms appear in early summer for several weeks and are carefully harvested by hand very early in the morning. Distillation occurs as quickly as possible after harvest in a two-step process. The condensed water collected from the first distillation contains a greater portion of essential oil (usually about 80%) than is collected directly; this water is redistilled to capture the essential oil contained therein, a process known as cohobation. The oil from this second distillation is combined with the essential oil that is acquired directly from the first distillation to yield what is known as Rose Otto.Applications (Uses and Indications):In aromatherapy, Rose Otto is renowned throughout history for its usefulness in skin care, its aphrodisiac properties, and its effectiveness on the reproductive system. It is indicated for healing emotional wounds and restoring trust and self-worth; for moisturizing, hydrating, and soothing skin; for its cleansing action on the digestive and circulatory systems and on the liver; and for helping to regulate the menstrual cycle. 
— Wonderworks 

The best smell in the whole world.

witchywonderworks:

Featured Oil: Rose Otto (Rosa damascena)

Historical/Traditional Uses:
The use of rose for medicinal purposes, most likely in the form of unguents made by macerating rose petals in hot fats or oils, is mentioned in Ayurvedic writings (~1500 BC to 500 CE) and in Dioscorides’ De Materia Medica (1st century BC). It is thought that roses were first distilled in the 8th century in Morocco to obtain rosewater, but there is evidence of primitive stills dating as far back as 10,000 BC. The physician and alchemist Avicenna is credited for being the first to distill roses for the essential oil in the 11th century. 

Extraction Process: Steam distillation
Blossoms appear in early summer for several weeks and are carefully harvested by hand very early in the morning. Distillation occurs as quickly as possible after harvest in a two-step process. The condensed water collected from the first distillation contains a greater portion of essential oil (usually about 80%) than is collected directly; this water is redistilled to capture the essential oil contained therein, a process known as cohobation. The oil from this second distillation is combined with the essential oil that is acquired directly from the first distillation to yield what is known as Rose Otto.

Applications (Uses and Indications):
In aromatherapy, Rose Otto is renowned throughout history for its usefulness in skin care, its aphrodisiac properties, and its effectiveness on the reproductive system. It is indicated for healing emotional wounds and restoring trust and self-worth; for moisturizing, hydrating, and soothing skin; for its cleansing action on the digestive and circulatory systems and on the liver; and for helping to regulate the menstrual cycle. 

Wonderworks 

The best smell in the whole world.

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Otto Didrik Ottesen (Danish, 1816-1892).
Nature’s Rewards, oil on canvas, 41,5 x 35,5 cm.

❤️

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Otto Didrik Ottesen (Danish, 1816-1892).

Nature’s Rewards, oil on canvas, 41,5 x 35,5 cm.

❤️

gwathir:

Summer Goddess Sun Tea with Chamomile Syrup 
Summer Goddess Sun Tea

Equal parts dried rose and hibiscus flowers, blended1-3 teaspoons of flowers per 8 oz of water

Brew sun tea by leaving a jar of water and flower petals in a sunny window for an hour or two. The hibiscus imparts its flavor quickly, so the tea doesn’t take long to brew. A caveat: there’s some risk of bacteria growth when making sun tea. If you think you’ll leave your tea out for more than a couple of hours, consider brewing it overnight in the refrigerator instead, or making it the old-fashioned way with boiling water. If you use boiling water, pour it over dried flowers, cover, and let sit for 10 minutes before straining.
Brown Sugar Chamomile Syrup

1 cup organic brown sugar1 cup water 1/2 cup dried chamomile flowers

In a medium saucepan combine sugar and water. Bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat and add chamomile flowers and cover with a lid. Jessa likes to add one cup of flowers for a strong chamomile flavor. If you prefer a more subtle flavor, add just a half cup of flowers. Allow to cool and then strain into a clean container and enjoy. Syrup can be refrigerated for up to one month.

gwathir:

Summer Goddess Sun Tea with Chamomile Syrup

Summer Goddess Sun Tea

Equal parts dried rose and hibiscus flowers, blended
1-3 teaspoons of flowers per 8 oz of water

Brew sun tea by leaving a jar of water and flower petals in a sunny window for an hour or two. The hibiscus imparts its flavor quickly, so the tea doesn’t take long to brew. A caveat: there’s some risk of bacteria growth when making sun tea. If you think you’ll leave your tea out for more than a couple of hours, consider brewing it overnight in the refrigerator instead, or making it the old-fashioned way with boiling water. If you use boiling water, pour it over dried flowers, cover, and let sit for 10 minutes before straining.

Brown Sugar Chamomile Syrup

1 cup organic brown sugar
1 cup water 
1/2 cup dried chamomile flowers

In a medium saucepan combine sugar and water. Bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat and add chamomile flowers and cover with a lid. Jessa likes to add one cup of flowers for a strong chamomile flavor. If you prefer a more subtle flavor, add just a half cup of flowers. Allow to cool and then strain into a clean container and enjoy. Syrup can be refrigerated for up to one month.

badesaba:

گل محمدی

persian rose